01 December 2012

December By Franz Melchers


9 comments:

alestedemadrid said...

Wonderful image...

Timothy Cahill said...

It has been a treat to go through the calendar with Franz Melchers. First snow of the season here began after midnight, officially December, and left the neighborhood looking much like his picture.

Jane said...

At last, our year with Franz Melchers is rounded out. Recently I read that Melchers was an early member of the avant-garde Brussels group Les XX during the 1880s and that he knew William Degouve de Nuncques and Jan Toorop, among others. Information on Melchers is hard to come by - I had to put on my French hat to find this little bit. Keep hoping with me that someone who knows more will share.

Jane said...

Tim, Franz Melchers's "L'An" makes me want to move to Belgium - at least for one day a month. Here in upstate New York we are enjoying the changing climate, a big improvement, if you ask someone like me who comes from New Jersey. What many people don't get about climate change is that an average temperature increase of one degree Fahrenheit would put us in New Jersey, two degrees gets us to northern Virginia, and only three measly degrees change would make upstate New York sweat like Georgia. Sorry. End of lecture.

zabras said...

oh I like this much!!!

Jane said...

Zabras, if you haven't looked at the other eleven months by Franz melchers, each one was posted on the first day of the month.

Anonymous said...

I own a pristine copy of the 1985 Melchers calendar and take it out to enjoy periodically. This morning I discovered that its dates correspond with those of 2013. A wonderful discovery!

Jane said...

Hello, Anonymous, I have a copy of that calendar too! Must dig it out this year, again. Thank you for the reminder.

PJK said...

To all Melchers fans: I have posted this info here before, but new people may have joined. After years of searching, I found and purchased a copy of Thomas Braun's "L'An," in 2005, from a Belgian bookseller. The book is in remarkably fine shape, with no loose pages or other internal faults. As might be expected with age, the book's thick cover shows some wear. Again, though, no serious faults are evident.

I initially discovered Melchers from the Met's notecards, which have been mentioned in this blog. A friend had a set, I noted the artist info on the back, and my search began in the late 1990s for a copy.